Tag Archives: ApocaLEGO

Zombie hordes, nuclear annihilation, rising sea levels, the monkeypox — the future doesn’t look too bright for all those smiling LEGO minifigs。 But survivors abound in the post-apocalyptic wasteland, entrenched in well-guarded camps or on the road in crazy armored contraptions。 Check out all these post-apoc models to see that there is indeed hope for LEGO humanity after all…

Raiding the last Redbox in a post-apocalyptic wasteland

With Hollywood shut down and most movie theaters closed worldwide due to COVID-19, new entertainment has been a little harder to come by lately. I’m not sure our current global pandemic was the inspiration behind ‘s scene, but we find the protagonist (played here by the Lucas minifig from the LEGO Stranger Things set) fishing for DVDs from what is apparently the very last Redbox to have survived an apocalypse that turned the water a toxic green.

Eli’s build features a slew of wonderful details, such as the rebar or conduits sticking out of the elevated roadway and electrical bits on the power pole built from pieces like a rollerskate (the new universal greeble piece). Eli makes good use of printed pieces on the Redbox machine, including old-school LEGO Space 1×1 button panels and window panes from the TARDIS in the LEGO Ideas Doctor Who set.

A bright spot in the wasteland

Not every image of the post-apocalypse world has to be Mad Max-inspired bleakness. Builder brings a bit of light and color to the wasteland two thousand years from now with their build New Babel浙江快乐12走势图. Graceful, densely packed microscale towers make for a great place to spend the end times. I particularly like the use of purple in the exterior wall. Also neat is seeing the backside of the yellow in the towers. And it may be a drab grey, but the use of a in the domed towers is clever.

Yeah, this looks like a great place to visit. But being post-apocalypse and all, you might not want to live there. If you’re looking for other scenic destinations, be sure to check out some of Mountain Hobbit’s other idyllic builds.

We’ll be safe in here

As we learned on the first US season of 浙江快乐12走势图LEGO Masters earlier this year, LEGO creations are best when they tell a story that is easily understood. has been setting up a story through his series of apocalyptic modular buildings, and the plot has become very clear with his latest scene. Here you see a family trying to escape their own impending doom, their car broken down, taking refuge in the back of a Nuka Cola truck.

They figured they’d be safe there for the night, but unbeknownst to them, they’d almost made it to the shelter. Turns out they didn’t make it. Whatever they were running from caught up with them that night, and they died right there, baby in arms.

Earlier this year, back when we could still gather in groups, this model was on display at Bricks Cascade. Keith was standing proudly beside his creation engaging with the public. A twelve year old kid came up and described the scene to his dad. Keith was floored at how well the intended story came across — I thought he might cry.

TBB cover photo for March 2020: Bricks, bricks never change

This Fallout homage by captures that moment you step out of the vault perfectly (and such a memorable moment it is in every game). Between the desolate landscape and the lonely billboard, it’s hard not to think of the better times before nuclear war, but let’s look at the positive side of things. Take a close look and you’ll spot many details that bring this Fallout scene to life — from the tires and exposed wires surrounding the vault entrance, the tears in the billboard leaving exposed boards, and the subtle curvature of the desertscape (we’ll be watching your Instagram for your technique reveal). The simple yet awe-inspiring contrast between the vault and the open world drew us to this image for March’s cover photos on The Brothers Brick social channels.

Building the Future

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A delightfully derelict and decrepit drive-in

Post-apocalyptic builds are popular in the LEGO community for some reason. Is it because we are fatalistic about the fate of society, and are certain it is all going to go up in mushroom clouds? Is it because we play video games that are set in a post-nuclear apocalyptic world? Do we just want to watch the world burn? Perhaps it is some combination of all those. brings us a scene from the video game Fallout 4, which at very least satisfies my second suggestion. The Starlight Theatre, a now decrepit drive-in movie theater, serves as the camp for some raiders, and is gloriously derelict. Vines and trees are growing up everywhere, and the buildings are all half-ruined.

Click to see more of the Starlight Theatre

The zombies are coming, so why aren’t you running?

I would not like to be the lone man with the dog in this latest build from Austrian builder . With only his trusted canine companion and his guns, gear, and guts, things do not look hopeful with a ravening herd of mindless zombies pouring around every corner down the decrepit street. The decay and dereliction of the once bustling industrial sector is beautifully crafted, with exposed studs here and there showing how things have been slowly coming apart. Bits of various brownish hues sprinkled about create the appearance of rusted metal, while the overgrown vegetation tells us that no one with any brains has lived there for some time. So why has the lone figure returned to risk his noggin among such undead adversaries? We don’t know.

What we do know is that the scene itself is huge, with the sprawling rail yards and the broken street。 I love the stacked shipping containers with partially opened doors using minifigure hands as handles, as well as the brick warehouse facade with cleverly arched windows。 Sharp eyes will notice that the large spool for cables in the foreground is made from two placed end-to-end。 Some builders might disagree with me, but I also appreciate it when tiles are not fully pressed down to look like loose boards, like on the flatbed rail car。 Careful details and creative parts usages abound throughout, making this a build that needs to looked at a few times to see everything。

A streetcar named Dystopia

Get your ticket for a cable car ride to the apocalypse in this dystopian future scene by . Your final stop is Catastrophe St. & Devastation Blvd. where trouble awaits around every corner!

The things I most appreciate about this scene are the little stories spread throughout. An intrepid traveller embarks at his stop and finds himself in dangerous surroundings. A madman protects his arsenal of garbage, while a shadowed figure lurks in a corner just waiting to relieve unsuspecting tourists of their possessions. Peril also comes from above in the form of a gun toting survivalist on the roof, looking for an opportunity to strike.

There are even spiders and a couple of baby dinos thrown in for good measure! I also love the overgrown look, accomplished using a wide variety of plant pieces in different shapes and colors. The organic palette of the foliage and crumbling gray building facade create a nice color contrast to the excellently built tan and blue cable car. The cracked and broken pavement is not only a great detail, it also breaks the straight line of the base, adding to the overall decrepit feeling of the scene.

Apocalypse build makes use of “shattered” bricks

“The End” clearly isn’t the end of fantastic LEGO creations in this post-apocalyptic build by . Using more than 50 as roadway, dozens of and a random assortment of brick debris, SweStar is able to pull of the look of mankind’s dreary future. I found the use of slopes as broken windows to be very insightful and realistic. The also stuck out due to it being one of the oldest LEGO accessories in this build, a literal relic from another time.

Brothers Brick

Searching for light in a dark world

Presentation can make all the difference in evaluating a LEGO model. Sometimes the photography is just as impressive as the build itself. brings us a moody post-apocalyptic scene full of mystery and unique parts usage. The picture is more than just a study on lighting, using a fog machine, or image composition. Instead, it is more about combining multiple camera tricks in order to provide visual context for compelling storytelling.

The build uses pieces to form much of the mecha’s structure. It was created as a study in parts for the LEGO blog, , but the unique parts usage does not end with lanterns. For example, there is the piece used as the ship’s engine and all the fun bits piled atop the roof. However, my favorite aspect of the scene would have to be the realistic rocks. Most of the surfaces are well-textured with angles between larger pieces achieving much of the sculpting. , of course done very carefully and not at all random. There are several other photos of this build on Revan New’s Flickr photostream and his article on New Elementary. With the article, you can see how some parts were done but, for me, this single photo makes the greatest impact.

The future is bright, colourful and apocalyptic

Maybe it’s the light blue water or maybe it’s the cheerfully bright photography of this LEGO creation by , but it looks almost like a postapocalyptic world would be quite the place to live。 Minus the whole probably being dead thing。

The overall scene looks mostly simple, combining few large monochromatic sections like the water, the grass, and the containers. The real details are hidden inside the containers and around them in the shape of a little tree, a very well made gradient of the oozing toxic waste, and a cute shelter inside the upper container.

Moving house – post-apocalypse style

Post-Apocalypse or “ApocaLEGO” is a LEGO building theme which can see more dull brown and grey creations than the most boilerplate of steampunk. Here’s a glorious exception to the rule by : an imaginative take on the genre which sees enterprising survivors build a moveable dwelling out of transport containers and a truck — like some mobile version of the stacks from Ready Player One. Revelling in its central idea, this model is gloriously detailed, festooned with every likely requirement of the wasteland warrior catered for — solar power, fresh water, air con, a vegetable garden, and even an outhouse for the effective disposal of waste!

Post Apocalypse LEGO crate house

This thing is well worth a closer look, and the builder has provided some imagery of various angles. Great attention to detail on the model — just look at all the little touches that have been crammed into it. This layer upon layer of detail has created an engaging model within a building theme that usually leaves me cold. I can’t imagine a better ride in which to tour our dystopian future.

Post Apocalypse LEGO crate house

A well-stocked wasteland workshop

If Santa and his elves survived the apocalypse, they would do very well for themselves in an outpost like this, built by . Without a landscape to define its locale, it would be equally at home on the edge of a toxic ocean, or the top of a rugged mountain peak. Besides a number of industrial details like an abundance of pipes going here and there, a tower crane for servicing what could be a submersible, or a drone, and a machine shop for working on a well armored truck, there is a thoughtful inclusion of alternate colored plates and bricks to lend a well-weathered look to the walls. I also like the way that Tony has crafted modules with subtly curved ridges to give the outpost a stacked, cobbled together look.

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See more details of this highly detailed post-apocalpytic workshop